A Backpack With Wheels Article

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A Backpack With Wheels- Article

I wouldn't have thought a backpack with wheels would actually work for backpacking, but when I saw the web site for the "Wheelpacker", I was impressed. I wouldn't have thought a backpack with wheels would actually work for backpacking, but when I saw the web site for the "Wheelpacker", I was impressed. You wear a frame that attaches you to a wheeled pack. It can even go over logs and rocks. It started me thinking about what other backpacking innovations are just waiting to be marketed. Here are a few of the things I came up with. Steal these ideas, please. With frame-less backpacks we often put folded sleeping pads in the pack for cushioning against our backs and some support for the load. Why not just have the part of the pack that rests against the user's back inflate. With the same technology used for lightweight self-inflating sleeping bag pads, it would only add about six ounces. The backpack could then double as a foot-bag/pad for sleeping. Taking this idea further, I imagine a self-inflating backpack that folds out into a sleeping pad.


The backpack "frame" would be the pad, in a "U" shape for some rigidity in the pack. Self-inflating sleeping bag pads are as light as 14 ounces now, and frame less packs 12 ounces, so the combination could probably be made to weigh just 20 ounces. Put backpacking food in wax-paper packaging instead of plastic. The packages then double as emergency fire-starters, since wax paper will usually burn even when wet. When I need to carry more water I use the plastic bladders from boxed wine. They are light, strong, and I inflate the bag with air to use as a pillow too. To market a dual-purpose water container/pillow, it just needs a soft removable covering of some sort. Why not a frame-less backpack with a jacket that is a part of the pack? It can be folded out of the way, and the pack would have normal shoulder straps. When wearing the jacket, though, it would stabilize the pack, keep you warmer, and make it easy to push through heavy brush, because it wouldn't catch on things as easily. It is something like wearing a large jacket over a backpack, but with the weight-savings and stability that come from combining them. Print a chess/checkers board on a jacket or backpack, and you have a carry-along game that weighs nothing extra. Great for spending hours in the tent waiting out the rain. If you don't carry the pieces, stones or pine cones could work as checkers. Backpacking gear ideas and innovations keep popping into my head as I write this. Most are based on the idea of "dual purpose" items. They may work, some may not, but it is an entertaining dose of inspiration from a backpack with wheels.


When asked about the right camping backpack, most people who do not have any experience in camping will say that it is just a bag. You will never be grateful for a good backpack until and unless you have bad experience with a bad one. For instance, a trekker who went on a trip to Appalachians in the year 1994 went back home broken and bleeding from the heaviness of a bad backpack which caused his hips to be injured. Ten years later, he was a lot wiser and experienced than he was before; he took a better backpack and had a better and much more fun-filled experience. 1. Recognize your requirements- The preferences of trekkers and campers are different. Whatever that is that you may take with you, it will be a basis for what kind of backpack you will require. Assess your space requirements. 2. Is the pack comfortable- When selecting a backpack, this is possibly the most essential point that you should keep in mind. When you have a good pack, it allocates the weight evenly and effectively.


As a result, you do not face any problem while carrying it. Usually most camp stores have sand weights to put in the pack. While you are examining the pack, ensure that the shoulder straps are comfortable. It would be advisable to move about with the pack in order to determine how much mobility the pack can provide. Usually most pack have sternum strap with them and these strap helps in stabilizing the pack. Hip belts should not restrict your respiration nor should it be too broad that it hinders in the way of your steadiness. The designs of the backpack will always be different and the backpack companies will always claim to have a new and improved pack for the purpose of camping. 3. Select your frame- You can choose between internal and external frames. The frames that are thinner and that hug your body closer are internal frames.



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